There’s nothing quite like the feel of handing out a spectacular business card. In a crowded market, it’s another way to differentiate, and I knew I needed something special. Martin Print had previously done some excellent work with the linux.conf.au team, producing NFC keytags to help promote the conference, and their workmanship was excellent. So, after some quick work in Inkscape to make the design, it was converted to PDF and then uploaded.

About thee weeks later, voila!

How does NFC work?

Near field communication enables wireless communication between compatible devices over short distances. It’s different technology to your home wi-fi though. Instead, it uses radio waves to transmit data from a transmitter to a receiver.

NFC devices can be considered either passive or active. Passive devices can transmit information to other NFC devices without a power source. The business card is an example of a passive device. Passive devices cannot receive information, they can only transmit it. Active devices can transmit and receive data. For example, your NFC-enabled smartphone is an active device, as are public transport card readers such as Oyster Card or Myki, and touch payment terminals like Paywave.

What are the limitations?

At this stage, only Android phones and Windows phones support NFC – which is an open standard – while, although iPhones have the technology, Apple hasn’t yet enabled it, but is likely to do so in the future. This means that my business card will only work on  your phone if it’s Android or Windows, and only if you’ve enabled NFC on your device.

Where can I use this technology?

NFC has a myriad of uses, such as tap-to-pay, and tapping an NFC card to dial a number, go to a website, store contact details, or even download an App. Move over, QR codes, NFC is here!

If you’re looking to experiment with NFC cards, don’t hesitate to make contact today to see how your business can use this technology.

I have one of your business cards, what can I do with it?

The card is designed so that if you tap it to your compatible smartphone, it will automatically take you to this website. Passive NFC tags can be locked or unlocked – that is, they can be writable or not. My business cards are deliberately unlocked – they are writable – meaning that you can experiment with them yourself.

Try some of these resources to get started: